He Died of Depression

I’ve been commenting on a Facebook thread in which the original poster wrote:

The quickest and easiest way for [me] to start a flame war in the comments section? By writing down [my] real opinion about the use of “medication” to treat psych disorders.

Anxiety medication with INCREASED RISK OF SUICIDE as a side effect. Unreal. And now a rock icon that I valued, respected and enjoyed — and a husband and father — is gone, almost certainly because of damned pills.

I can’t even put into words how much I loathe psychiatry. I’m basically Tom Cruise on this subject.

The person posting the above did indeed get dozens of comments, on both sides of the issue… with far too many people screaming that psychiatric medications kill people, are the worst things on the planet, etc etc.

As a social worker, I’ve seen people who haven’t been helped by medications and people with nasty side effects (drooling, weight gain, the “Thorazine shuffle”).  I’ve argued with a doctor in ICU, that a family member should NOT be given low dose Haldol for anxiety.  (It is my belief – from talking to psychiatric patients – that Haldol, one of the first antipsychotics – is nothing more than a chemical restraint.  The patient still has the symptoms, but can’t react to them, thus making the medical personnel’s life easier but not the patient’s.  It is still prescribed because it costs pennies to administer, unlike other, much more expensive medications.)

I’ve also seen far more people who have been given their lives back by the use of psychiatric medications, particularly the newer ones.

The medical world can see cancer cells and target them for treatment. Physicians can see heart disease and treat it.

Depression and anxiety, however… with those we have to depend on the person’s history, his or her self-report and our interpretation of physical signs.  However, too often there’s not much in the way of objective physical signs for us to go on.  For example, does the patient appear lethargic? Does she have dulled affect?  Does he appear “tense”?  It’s not like a more physical ailment where you can hear the rattling of pneumonia in one’s chest, or measure a blood sugar spike or hypertensive episode.

With depression and anxiety (and a whole host of other psychiatric conditions), the treating medical or clinical practitioner has to depend on that patient’s self-report to identify the symptoms and make a diagnosis, and those symptoms can seem unrelated to what’s really going on.

The patient may complain of headaches, digestive problems, sleep deprivation, aches & pains, lack of appetite (or increased appetite), chest pain, etc – none of which are typically easy for the clinician to see.

The distinction that anti-meds people don’t get is that when people die of cancer or heart attacks, it seems as though the body just gave up, even if there were things the person could have done to have prevented that heart attack or that cancer.  But if the person was on medications for that cancer or heart disease and dies anyway, there isn’t a huge outcry of “the medical community makes us take these horrible medications that don’t work”.

For some reason, when someone is on medications for an illness that is just as lethal as heart disease or cancer (and depression and anxiety are indeed lethal illnesses), and dies anyway (by suicide), there’s this persistent belief that it’s the medications that caused that death.

Let’s get this straight.

Suicide is nearly always caused by depression or anxiety. When a person dies of heart disease, she’s said to die of heart disease. When a person dies of cancer, he’s said to die of cancer.

When my husband died of depression & anxiety, the death certificate stated that he died of “an intraoral gunshot wound”.

NO!

My husband died of depression and anxiety.

In this instance, it doesn’t matter whether he was on medications or not (he was not).  My husband’s depression and his anxiety killed him.

*****************************

For more information about The Warrior Project – soon to be a drop-in and counseling center for those affected by suicide and/or suicidal thoughts, please click on the picture or link, or go to https://warrior-project.org.

The Warrior Project will eventually become a warm, welcoming drop-in center for those living with extreme emotional and/or physical pain coupled with hopelessness, and a resource for families and friends fearing for the life of, or grieving the loss of, the person they love so much.

We are accepting blogs and articles written on topics relevant to suicide, hopelessness, grief, and similar topics.  Please contact Linda at LSnyder@regroupbiz.com or warriorprojectmaine@gmail.com.

*************************************

In memory of my beloved husband John Kelly Snyder… 20 Sept 1956 – 21 Oct 2016.

My Johnny was a true warrior, fighting demons no one else could see.  I thought he was the strongest man in the world, and perhaps he was, but tragically, the demons got the better of him.

The name of this project is in no way intended to be reflective of, or piggy back off, Wounded Warriors which serves those military personnel wounded after September 11, 20o1.  Like too many others, John was a warrior long before then.

Fair winds and following seas, Husband.

**************************************

We now have a group on Facebook to help find resources, support and ideas for getting The Warrior Project off the ground.  You can find us there at https://www.facebook.com/groups/thewarriorproject/

Follow us on Twitter!  @WarriorProjME.

**************************************

The Warrior Project is NOT an emergency program or service.

In the event of a crisis, please call 911

In the United States, other numbers to call include:
Maine Crisis Hotline:
1-888-568-1112
National Suicide Prevention Hotline:
800-273-8255
Veterans Suicide Hotline:
800-273-8255
Domestic Violence Hotline:
800-799-7233

*******************************

John and I owned both a small antiques shop and a used bookstore in Lewiston, Maine. After John died, I didn’t know what I wanted to do with the two shops – they take up a huge amount of time, and weren’t yet covering their own costs.  After John died in October of 2016, the shops were barely open during the critical holiday sales season; I couldn’t stand being in them because we had such dreams for the future.

But Johnny loved his little bookstore (Heritage Books, Maps & Ephemera) and the goal was that he would one day “retire” into running the two shops.  So I’ve committed to keeping them open, although Heritage Collectibles is now Heritage Collectibles, Books & Maps as I’ve combined those two businesses, and I’m opening Papa’s Thrift Shop for the inventory that doesn’t really work in the main store.  (Papa is what John’s grandchildren called him.)

All of the profits from those two businesses (after expenses, of course!) will go to support The Warrior Project.  If you are so inclined, please consider checking out our shops, knowing that your purchase will help fund this critically needed suicide prevention drop in center.

Posted in Death & Dying, Grief, Loneliness, Suicide | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

No Group Meeting Saturday, May 6

There will be no group meeting Saturday evening, May 6th as the facilitator has another commitment.  Hope to see you next week!

My apologies for any inconvenience or difficulties this may present.  If you are in immediate need of help or support, please remember that while we are not an emergency service we do understand the need to connect with someone.

The following supports are there for you.

Maine Crisis Hotline:
1-888-568-1112
National Suicide Prevention Hotline:
800-273-8255
Veterans Suicide Hotline:
800-273-8255
Domestic Violence Hotline:
800-799-7233

*****************************

For more information about The Warrior Project – soon to be a drop-in and counseling center for those affected by suicide and/or suicidal thoughts, please click on the picture or link, or go to https://warrior-project.org.

The Warrior Project will eventually become a warm, welcoming drop-in center for those living with extreme emotional and/or physical pain coupled with hopelessness, and a resource for families and friends fearing for the life of, or grieving the loss of, the person they love so much.

We are accepting blogs and articles written on topics relevant to suicide, hopelessness, grief, and similar topics.  Please contact Linda at LSnyder@regroupbiz.com or warriorprojectmaine@gmail.com.

*************************************

In memory of my beloved husband John Kelly Snyder… 20 Sept 1956 – 21 Oct 2016.

My Johnny was a true warrior, fighting demons no one else could see.  I thought he was the strongest man in the world, and perhaps he was, but tragically, the demons got the better of him.

The name of this project is in no way intended to be reflective of, or piggy back off, Wounded Warriors which serves those military personnel wounded after September 11, 20o1.  Like too many others, John was a warrior long before then.

Fair winds and following seas, Husband.

**************************************

We now have a group on Facebook to help find resources, support and ideas for getting The Warrior Project off the ground.  You can find us there at https://www.facebook.com/groups/thewarriorproject/

Follow us on Twitter!  @WarriorProjME.

**************************************

The Warrior Project is NOT an emergency program or service.

In the event of a crisis, please call 911

In the United States, other numbers to call include:
Maine Crisis Hotline:
1-888-568-1112
National Suicide Prevention Hotline:
800-273-8255
Veterans Suicide Hotline:
800-273-8255
Domestic Violence Hotline:
800-799-7233

*******************************

John and I owned both a small antiques shop and a used bookstore in Lewiston, Maine. After John died, I didn’t know what I wanted to do with the two shops – they take up a huge amount of time, and weren’t yet covering their own costs.  After John died in October of 2016, the shops were barely open during the critical holiday sales season; I couldn’t stand being in them because we had such dreams for the future.

But Johnny loved his little bookstore (Heritage Books, Maps & Ephemera) and the goal was that he would one day “retire” into running the two shops.  So I’ve committed to keeping them open, although Heritage Collectibles is now Heritage Collectibles, Books & Maps as I’ve combined those two businesses, and I’m opening Papa’s Thrift Shop for the inventory that doesn’t really work in the main store.  (Papa is what John’s grandchildren called him.)

All of the profits from those two businesses (after expenses, of course!) will go to support The Warrior Project.  If you are so inclined, please consider checking out our shops, knowing that your purchase will help fund this critically needed suicide prevention drop in center.

Posted in Death & Dying, Grief, Loneliness, Suicide | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Contracting for Safety i.e. a No Suicide Contract – Does It Work?

 

Back in the 1990s and earlier, “contracting for safety” was very common.   Someone would present as potentially suicidal and a mental health worker would gain either verbal or written agreement (a “no suicide contract”) that the person would not attempt to harm himself or herself, and would call a professional if the urge became too great to manage.

Supposedly that contract would create a promise that the suicidal individual wouldn’t want to break, because breaking promises is a bad thing, right?

I always thought that contracting for safety was ineffective at best, and perhaps even stupid or counter productive.  However, no one ever suicided in any immediate time frame after entering into such a contract with me or my co-workers, which was supposedly proof that they worked.

My suspicion was that those we were using the contract with (people with serious and persistent mental illness, who were so-called “revolving door” clients of the state’s mental health institutions) had the resources needed to ensure some level of safety despite the intensity of their mental illnesses.  The people who were actually attempting and/or succeeding seemed to be a very different demographic.

As for me, I’ve always said that if it ever came to that point, don’t bother trying to get me to agree to such a contract. First, I won’t make a promise if I don’t know if I can keep it… even one as simple as my supervisor at work asking, “Will you promise me you will get your payroll in on time?” (Rather than half an hour late which was often typical of me given my two full-time jobs, volunteering and other commitments.)

I told her that I would always do my best but would never make a promise I didn’t know if I could keep.  As it turns out, my payroll has been on time every single time in the ensuing months since that conversation, but I refused then and I would still refuse even now to “promise”.

Second, even if I did enter into such a promise (or any kind of promise) because I truly wanted to live up to the other person’s expectations, or alleviate his or her concerns or anxieties, there’s always the possibility of extenuating circumstances that would work to nullify that promise. And suicidality is – almost by definition – an extenuating circumstance.

The black cloud, the despair, the hopelessness… Under those circumstances it seems that a promise not to harm oneself – at least a promise to a mental health professional – would be rather unlikely to be enough to abort the overwhelming need to end the pain.

[A promise to a spouse, partner, child, parent… that may be different.  I will always wonder if had I known my husband was actively suicidal, and if I had said to him more forcefully and more often “You are not a burden. We will get through this.  I love you no matter what” if he would have made a different choice that fateful day.  Perhaps, but then again, his physical health was so compromised and his daily pain so great, that it was almost certainly just a matter of time anyway.  Devastatingly, I will never know.]

I’ve lived through some very harsh times… times I didn’t know how I would ever survive.  But I’ve never been actively suicidal, and I can’t believe I ever will be.  So perhaps my understanding of this is too limited.

Thoughts?

*****************************

For more information about The Warrior Project – soon to be a drop-in and counseling center for those affected by suicide and/or suicidal thoughts, please click on the picture or link, or go to https://warrior-project.org.

The Warrior Project will eventually become a warm, welcoming drop-in center for those living with extreme emotional and/or physical pain coupled with hopelessness, and a resource for families and friends fearing for the life of, or grieving the loss of, the person they love so much.

We are accepting blogs and articles written on topics relevant to suicide, hopelessness, grief, and similar topics.  Please contact Linda at LSnyder@regroupbiz.com or warriorprojectmaine@gmail.com.

*************************************

In memory of my beloved husband John Kelly Snyder… 20 Sept 1956 – 21 Oct 2016.

My Johnny was a true warrior, fighting demons no one else could see.  I thought he was the strongest man in the world, and perhaps he was, but tragically, the demons got the better of him.

The name of this project is in no way intended to be reflective of, or piggy back off, Wounded Warriors which serves those military personnel wounded after September 11, 20o1.  Like too many others, John was a warrior long before then.

Fair winds and following seas, Husband.

**************************************

We now have a group on Facebook to help find resources, support and ideas for getting The Warrior Project off the ground.  You can find us there at https://www.facebook.com/groups/thewarriorproject/

Follow us on Twitter!  @WarriorProjME.

**************************************

The Warrior Project is NOT an emergency program or service.

In the event of a crisis, please call 911

In the United States, other numbers to call include:
Maine Crisis Hotline:
1-888-568-1112
National Suicide Prevention Hotline:
800-273-8255
Veterans Suicide Hotline:
800-273-8255
Domestic Violence Hotline:
800-799-7233

*******************************

John and I owned both a small antiques shop and a used bookstore in Lewiston, Maine. After John died, I didn’t know what I wanted to do with the two shops – they take up a huge amount of time, and weren’t yet covering their own costs.  After John died in October of 2016, the shops were barely open during the critical holiday sales season; I couldn’t stand being in them because we had such dreams for the future.

But Johnny loved his little bookstore (Heritage Books, Maps & Ephemera) and the goal was that he would one day “retire” into running the two shops.  So I’ve committed to keeping them open, although Heritage Collectibles is now Heritage Collectibles, Books & Maps as I’ve combined those two businesses, and I’m opening Papa’s Thrift Shop for the inventory that doesn’t really work in the main store.  (Papa is what John’s grandchildren called him.)

All of the profits from those two businesses (after expenses, of course!) will go to support The Warrior Project.  If you are so inclined, please consider checking out our shops, knowing that your purchase will help fund this critically needed suicide prevention drop in center.

Posted in Death & Dying, Grief, Suicide | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Profits from Two Businesses to Help Fund The Warrior Project

 

John and I owned both a small antiques shop and a used bookstore in Lewiston, Maine. After John died, I didn’t know what I wanted to do with the two shops – they take up a huge amount of time (and I’m a full-time social worker), and weren’t yet covering their own costs.

After John died in October of 2016, the shops were barely open during the critical holiday sales season; I couldn’t bear being in them because he and I had been having such fun with them, and we’d had such dreams for the future of the businesses.

But Johnny loved his little bookstore (Heritage Books, Maps & Ephemera) and the goal was that he would one day “retire” into running the two shops.

It took me several months to decide what I’d do.  Close them entirely?  Move everything to our home?  Keep them going?  I didn’t know if I even cared anymore.

The old adage is not to make any major decisions for a year after a traumatic event such as the death of a loved one.  So even though I was now losing more money than I could afford to on those shops, I just slogged along and did what I could, when I could.

As time has marched on (despite my screaming desire to turn the clocks back to before the horrible day when my husband killed himself), I’ve decided that keeping those shops open is yet another of the many ways on my long list of how I can honor a man I loved more than I know how to say.

So I’ve committed to keeping them open, although Heritage Collectibles is now Heritage Collectibles, Books & Maps (189 Main Street, Lewiston) as I’ve combined those two businesses, and I’m opening Papa’s Thrift Shop (5 Park Street, Lewiston) for the inventory that doesn’t really work in the main store.  (Papa is what John’s grandchildren called him.)

All of the profits from those two businesses (after expenses, of course!) will go to support The Warrior Project.  If you are so inclined, please consider checking out our shops, knowing that your purchase will help fund this critically needed suicide prevention and counseling drop in center.

Thank you.

*****************************

For more information about The Warrior Project – soon to be a drop-in and counseling center for those affected by suicide and/or suicidal thoughts, please click on the picture or link, or go to https://warrior-project.org.

The Warrior Project will eventually become a warm, welcoming drop-in center for those living with extreme emotional and/or physical pain coupled with hopelessness, and a resource for families and friends fearing for the life of, or grieving the loss of, the person they love so much.

We are accepting blogs and articles written on topics relevant to suicide, hopelessness, grief, and similar topics.  Please contact Linda at LSnyder@regroupbiz.com or warriorprojectmaine@gmail.com.

*************************************

In memory of my beloved husband John Kelly Snyder… 20 Sept 1956 – 21 Oct 2016.

My Johnny was a true warrior, fighting demons no one else could see.  I thought he was the strongest man in the world, and perhaps he was, but tragically, the demons got the better of him.

The name of this project is in no way intended to be reflective of, or piggy back off, Wounded Warriors which serves those military personnel wounded after September 11, 20o1.  Like too many others, John was a warrior long before then.

Fair winds and following seas, Husband.

**************************************

We now have a group on Facebook to help find resources, support and ideas for getting The Warrior Project off the ground.  You can find us there at https://www.facebook.com/groups/thewarriorproject/

Follow us on Twitter!  @WarriorProjME.

**************************************

The Warrior Project is NOT an emergency program or service.

In the event of a crisis, please call 911

In the United States, other numbers to call include:
Maine Crisis Hotline:
1-888-568-1112
National Suicide Prevention Hotline:
800-273-8255
Veterans Suicide Hotline:
800-273-8255
Domestic Violence Hotline:
800-799-7233

*******************************

John and I owned both a small antiques shop and a used bookstore in Lewiston, Maine. After John died, I didn’t know what I wanted to do with the two shops – they take up a huge amount of time, and weren’t yet covering their own costs.  After John died in October of 2016, the shops were barely open during the critical holiday sales season; I couldn’t stand being in them because we had such dreams for the future.

But Johnny loved his little bookstore (Heritage Books, Maps & Ephemera) and the goal was that he would one day “retire” into running the two shops.  So I’ve committed to keeping them open, although Heritage Collectibles is now Heritage Collectibles, Books & Maps as I’ve combined those two businesses, and I’m opening Papa’s Thrift Shop for the inventory that doesn’t really work in the main store.  (Papa is what John’s grandchildren called him.)

All of the profits from those two businesses (after expenses, of course!) will go to support The Warrior Project.  If you are so inclined, please consider checking out our shops, knowing that your purchase will help fund this critically needed suicide prevention drop in center.

Posted in Heritage Collectibles Books & Maps, John K Snyder, Papa's Thrift Shop, Suicide, Warrior Project | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

You’re Not a Victim for Sharing Your Story

 

This quote is a complete blog in and of itself.  Thank you to Alex Elle.

*****************************

For more information about The Warrior Project – soon to be a drop-in and counseling center for those affected by suicide and/or suicidal thoughts, please click on the picture or link, or go to https://warrior-project.org.

The Warrior Project will eventually become a warm, welcoming drop-in center for those living with extreme emotional and/or physical pain coupled with hopelessness, and a resource for families and friends fearing for the life of, or grieving the loss of, the person they love so much.

We are accepting blogs and articles written on topics relevant to suicide, hopelessness, grief, and similar topics.  Please contact Linda at LSnyder@regroupbiz.com or warriorprojectmaine@gmail.com.

*************************************

In memory of my beloved husband John Kelly Snyder… 20 Sept 1956 – 21 Oct 2016.

My Johnny was a true warrior, fighting demons no one else could see.  I thought he was the strongest man in the world, and perhaps he was, but tragically, the demons got the better of him.

The name of this project is in no way intended to be reflective of, or piggy back off, Wounded Warriors which serves those military personnel wounded after September 11, 20o1.  Like too many others, John was a warrior long before then.

Fair winds and following seas, Husband.

**************************************

We now have a group on Facebook to help find resources, support and ideas for getting The Warrior Project off the ground.  You can find us there at https://www.facebook.com/groups/thewarriorproject/

Follow us on Twitter!  @WarriorProjME.

**************************************

The Warrior Project is NOT an emergency program or service.

In the event of a crisis, please call 911

In the United States, other numbers to call include:
Maine Crisis Hotline:
1-888-568-1112
National Suicide Prevention Hotline:
800-273-8255
Veterans Suicide Hotline:
800-273-8255
Domestic Violence Hotline:
800-799-7233

*******************************

John and I owned both a small antiques shop and a used bookstore in Lewiston, Maine. After John died, I didn’t know what I wanted to do with the two shops – they take up a huge amount of time, and weren’t yet covering their own costs.  After John died in October of 2016, the shops were barely open during the critical holiday sales season; I couldn’t stand being in them because we had such dreams for the future.

But Johnny loved his little bookstore (Heritage Books, Maps & Ephemera) and the goal was that he would one day “retire” into running the two shops.  So I’ve committed to keeping them open, although Heritage Collectibles is now Heritage Collectibles, Books & Maps as I’ve combined those two businesses, and I’m opening Papa’s Thrift Shop for the inventory that doesn’t really work in the main store.  (Papa is what John’s grandchildren called him.)

All of the profits from those two businesses (after expenses, of course!) will go to support The Warrior Project.  If you are so inclined, please consider checking out our shops, knowing that your purchase will help fund this critically needed suicide prevention drop in center.

Posted in Death & Dying, Grief, Loneliness, Suicide | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Six Months

Six months.  My wonderful, brilliant, talented husband has been dead for six months.

The death certificate deemed it an “intra-oral gunshot wound”.   Simply put, he killed himself.

Someone just commented on a blog that he would never suicide because of the pain it would cause those he loves, that if it ever got that bad, he would talk it out with people.  I always thought the same; that I could never do such a thing to my family.  But clearly, I’ve never been as desperate as John was.

I wish it could have been easier for John.  There was just too much… and he was ashamed of the burden he believed he was placing on me. His health was shot, he was in near constant pain and was almost certainly dying from emphysema and probable lung cancer, and he had emotional demons that were haunting him.  He was drinking to excess. He had what he saw as a no-win scenario with only one way out.   This was no Kobayashi Maru where Jim Kirk could cheat death by changing the rules. My husband decided to cheat death by ensuring he went on his own terms.

John had worked for two decades as a subcontractor installing survival systems on 105 different Navy ships all over the world. He often wondered what would happen if a fire broke out on one of those ships; as he described it, a fire was the worst possible nightmare that could happen in those tight quarters.

Would he have the guts to give up one of the few survival suits available to one of the much younger crewmen?  He hoped he would, but the thought plagued him. I am convinced that John saw his failing health, his excessive drinking, and his inner torment as a similar nightmare situation that was only getting worse by the day and which he could see was also tearing me apart.  I am also convinced that he chose to sacrifice his life in order to save me from what he believed would destroy not only himself but me as well in the end.

He was – and always will be – a hero in my book. Not because he suicided – he did not ask my permission and even if he had, I would not have given it – and certainly not because of some pretty self-destructive behaviors, but because he tried to do the right thing, even when his demons pushed him in the wrong direction.

Footnote: Johnny always said he helped build killing machines and I helped save lives.  I know he lived longer than he would have if he hadn’t loved me so much, but I desperately wish I could have done more for him.

I will continue my work, trying to make a difference in my small corner of the world.  He was proud of me before, and I hope he continues to be.

*****************************

For more information about The Warrior Project – soon to be a drop-in and counseling center for those affected by suicide and/or suicidal thoughts, please click on the picture or link, or go to https://warrior-project.org.

The Warrior Project will eventually become a warm, welcoming drop-in center for those living with extreme emotional and/or physical pain coupled with hopelessness, and a resource for families and friends fearing for the life of, or grieving the loss of, the person they love so much.

We are accepting blogs and articles written on topics relevant to suicide, hopelessness, grief, and similar topics.  Please contact Linda at LSnyder@regroupbiz.com or warriorprojectmaine@gmail.com.

*************************************

In memory of my beloved husband John Kelly Snyder… 20 Sept 1956 – 21 Oct 2016.

My Johnny was a true warrior, fighting demons no one else could see.  I thought he was the strongest man in the world, and perhaps he was, but tragically, the demons got the better of him.

The name of this project is in no way intended to be reflective of, or piggy back off, Wounded Warriors which serves those military personnel wounded after September 11, 20o1.  Like too many others, John was a warrior long before then.

Fair winds and following seas, Husband.

**************************************

We now have a group on Facebook to help find resources, support and ideas for getting The Warrior Project off the ground.  You can find us there at https://www.facebook.com/groups/thewarriorproject/

Follow us on Twitter!  @WarriorProjME.

**************************************

The Warrior Project is NOT an emergency program or service.

In the event of a crisis, please call 911

In the United States, other numbers to call include:
Maine Crisis Hotline:
1-888-568-1112
National Suicide Prevention Hotline:
800-273-8255
Veterans Suicide Hotline:
800-273-8255
Domestic Violence Hotline:
800-799-7233

*******************************

John and I owned both a small antiques shop and a used bookstore in Lewiston, Maine. After John died, I didn’t know what I wanted to do with the two shops – they take up a huge amount of time, and weren’t yet covering their own costs.  After John died in October of 2016, the shops were barely open during the critical holiday sales season; I couldn’t stand being in them because we had such dreams for the future.

But Johnny loved his little bookstore (Heritage Books, Maps & Ephemera) and the goal was that he would one day “retire” into running the two shops.  So I’ve committed to keeping them open, although Heritage Collectibles is now Heritage Collectibles, Books & Maps as I’ve combined those two businesses, and I’m opening Papa’s Thrift Shop for the inventory that doesn’t really work in the main store.  (Papa is what John’s grandchildren called him.)

All of the profits from those two businesses (after expenses, of course!) will go to support The Warrior Project.  If you are so inclined, please consider checking out our shops, knowing that your purchase will help fund this critically needed suicide prevention drop in center.

Posted in Death & Dying, Grief, Loneliness, Suicide | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tuesday, March 21st Support Group Canceled

 

The Tuesday night support group will not meet again this week.  The facilitator is still ill with pneumonia.  It’s our hope that we’ll be back up and running on Saturday evening for that group.

Thank you for your understanding.

 

 

*****************************

For more information about The Warrior Project – soon to be a drop-in and counseling center for those affected by suicide and/or suicidal thoughts, please click on the picture or link, or go to https://warrior-project.org.

The Warrior Project will eventually become a warm, welcoming drop-in center for those living with extreme emotional and/or physical pain coupled with hopelessness, and a resource for families and friends fearing for the life of, or grieving the loss of, the person they love so much.

We are accepting blogs and articles written on topics relevant to suicide, hopelessness, grief, and similar topics.  Please contact Linda at LSnyder@regroupbiz.com or warriorprojectmaine@gmail.com.

*************************************

In memory of my beloved husband John Kelly Snyder… 20 Sept 1956 – 21 Oct 2016.

My Johnny was a true warrior, fighting demons no one else could see.  I thought he was the strongest man in the world, and perhaps he was, but tragically, the demons got the better of him.

The name of this project is in no way intended to be reflective of, or piggy back off, Wounded Warriors which serves those wounded after September 11, 20o1.  Like too many others, John was a warrior long before then.

Fair winds and following seas, Husband.

**************************************

We now have a group on Facebook to help find resources, support and ideas for getting The Warrior Project off the ground.  You can find us there at https://www.facebook.com/groups/thewarriorproject/

Follow us on Twitter!  @WarriorProjME.

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The Warrior Project is NOT an emergency program or service.

In the event of a crisis, please call 911

In the United States, other numbers to call include:
Maine Crisis Hotline:
1-888-568-1112
National Suicide Prevention Hotline:
800-273-8255
Veterans Suicide Hotline:
800-273-8255
Domestic Violence Hotline:
800-799-7233

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